James M. Dunn Next Generation Fund

James M. Dunn (1932-2015) served as Executive Director of the Baptist Joint Committee from 1981-1999.  Through his tenure at the BJC and later as a professor at the School of Divinity at Wake Forest University, Dr. Dunn trained impassioned advocates for religious freedom and the separation of church and state.  In lieu of flowers, his family suggested that memorial gifts be sent to the BJC or the School of Divinity at Wake Forest University. With that in mind, we established the James M. Dunn Next Generation Fund. Our goal is to continue Dr. Dunn’s commitment to training and mentoring the next generation of religious liberty advocates. By contributing to this fund, you are helping to ensure that future generations will enjoy religious liberty for all people.

**Click here to learn more about Dr. Dunn’s life and watch a video of his memorial service.**

Use the form below to make a secure, one-time online gift using your debit or credit card.

If you would like to give by check, please mail to:

Baptist Joint Committee
200 Maryland Ave., N.E.
Washington, DC 20002

 

The 20th century had no greater champion of religious freedom – of conscience – than James Dunn. Like Roger Williams, John Leland, George W. Truett and the other great Baptist leaders before him, James understood the dangers of civil religion.

“The 20th century had no greater champion of religious freedom – of conscience – than James Dunn. Like Roger Williams, John Leland, George W. Truett and the other great Baptist leaders before him, James understood the dangers of civil religion.” — Oliver “Buzz” Thomas, Former BJC General Counsel

Walker_Dunn for dunn fund

“I stand in James’ shoes and on his shoulders every day. We are all impoverished by his death, but heaven is enriched. How fitting that he died — like fellow freedom advocates Thomas Jefferson and John Adams — on the Fourth of July.” — Brent Walker, BJC Executive Director

 

 

 

James Dunn and Bill Moyers: “The Intersection”

James Dunn was a fierce advocate of “soul freedom.” He believed that religion should be voluntary, not forced. In this 1996 interview with journalist Bill Moyers, Dunn explains the importance of this concept as well as the Baptist heritage of religious freedom and the separation of church and state. For discussion guides that go with this program, visit BJConline.org/TheIntersection.